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Subi
Subi Memorial




Cookie-Wookie entered another dimension 9:30a April 23, 2013. I can' t imagine not having Cookie around. Her spirit is strong and will always be present. I love you Wook.

For
Cookie Tribute including photos, poems and listener emails, click here.


Rescued from a kill shelter in Manteca, Petey Pumpkinhead III entered our lives 7 years ago. Abused by a previous owner he was skittish and nippish. That changed with love, affection and attention.

He was a majestic furry orange tabby. His coat emitted a perpetually lovely fragrance. He had the sexiest strut with an ever present erect tail and endearing behind.

Petey had simple needs. Belly rubs topped the list. He loved resting in his backyard igloo. He would prance out when I entered the yard and open wide for belly rubs and rolly polly.

He bonded with Klimey who also was rescued from a shelter. Klimey loved licking Petey and taught Petey how to love back. They were inseparable.

Petey-Weedy (as we called him) evolved into the sweetest and most gentle of companions. When hungry, he would jump into bed and delicately place his paw on my face. No histrionics, just a love tap and breakfast was on.

He loved sleeping inside the space between my legs or alongside the curve of Clara's thigh. His body language suggested the most delicious of dreams. He also had the squeakiest yawn when awakened.

Petey had a ravenous appetite and wore his weight well. That changed last October when he dropped 2 pounds in short order and was diagnosed with congestive heart failure.

He continued to lose weight but his sweet demeanor never changed. Although not a lap cat during his youth, lately I would place him in my lap in the back yard and we would stay together for long periods. These were cherished moments. Klimey would join us and stay by Petey's side.

Strong medication was required every 8 hours to dissipate the fluid in his lungs. No matter how much lasix was dosed, it could not stay on top of the progression of his heart disease.

Last week Petey hit a low point and could hardly breath. He hadn't eaten for 2+ days. We upped the lasix and he recovered miraculously. His breathing appeared normal and he started eating - but only food fresh out of the can. He ate more than he had in months. He had playful sparring sessions with Klimey, tons of rolly polly and belly rubs, his tail was erect and he slept next to my face the other day.

Today he had a good appetite in the early afternoon. I didn't see him the rest of the day. When the thunder rumbled and the rain came pouring down I went outside.

He was in the igloo. I tipped it and he ran inside. But something was wrong.

His breathing was labored. Petey could not catch his breath. He had breathing attacks before and I had feared the worst, yet Petey always persevered.

An hour or so later when Clara came home, Petey's condition had worsened. When he walked from under a table to lie down in the litter box that was an alarming signal. I picked him up and he let out a cry. Petey went under the bed where Klimey was and continued to make anguished yelps.

We left him alone. Petey soon emerged and we put him in a blanket by the heater.

He wanted to be left alone.

Petey-Weedy barely could walk and stumbled out the bedroom and down a few steps to the cat door. Somehow he pushed himself through. The igloo was two feet from the door.

We let him be.

An hour later Clara checked on Petey.

His fur was gorgeous. His body still warm.

But Petey had passed.

He never made it to the igloo.



Next Tangents Turkey Music Tour

October 5-21 2014

Only 4 Spaces left!

Click for Testimonials
and
2013 Itinerary in review


  Sumru Agiryuruyen and Cenk Erdogan
performing at an intimate venue during the May 2013 Tangents Turkey Music Tour. Our group sat a few feet from the performers.

Email below to subscribe to
Tangents Turkey newsletter
and/or
 2014 Tangents Turkey Music Tour Sampler
(click here for playlist)




We not only immerse ourselves with the locals but even wild boars as this one approached us in a friendlly manner as we picknicked by the Aegean during the May 2013 tour.

"Best Turkish Music Tour!
I can't imagine a better way to explore the richness of Turkish culture than through its music. A guided music tour led by World Music expert Dore Stein would be unforgettable. Dore opens doors that music-lovers who travel on their own don't even know are there."

Tom Brosnahan, Turkey Travel Planner

TTP is the best on-line resource for all things Turkish.

Tom is the dean of Turkey travel writers who wrote the first five best selling Lonely Planet Turkey guides.


Yinon Muallem Ensemble performing in Istanbul during 2013 Tangents Turkey Music Tour
 

Yinon Muallem solo living room concert Tangents party
Sunday June 1
 

info:  tangentsradio (at) gmail.com
or
415 584-4367

3 tickets left as of 4/21/14



Listen to Tangents
Sat. nights, 8-mid, KALW 91.7 FM, S.F.
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Songlines Music Travel
(click for details)

Shares the Tangents philosophy that nothing beats experiencing music at its source.

2014 Trips:

Cuba - The Music of Cuba
May 3-17 2014 & May 10-17 2014

Portugal - Lisbon - The Home of Fado
June 12-15 2014

Morocco - Essaouira Gnawa Festival
June 12-16 2014 & June 12-19 2014

Malaysia - Rainforest Festival

June 15-24 2014 & June 16-23 2014

Serbia - Guca Brass Band Festival
August 7-12 2014

Romania - At Home with the Gypsies
September 20-28 2014

India - Rajasthan Musical Adventure
October 7-21  2014 & October 10-21 2014

Senegal - Never Mind the Mbalax
November 21-30 2014

Cuba  - New Year Celebrations
December 29 2014-January 12 2015

** 2014 festival/trip dates are still to be announced

Gaza/Israel News
Click above for archive
(Archve does not view in Google Chrome)
Click headlines below for full stories
Music Feature: Gaza Corner
11pm, Tangents, 91.7 fm, SF, kalw.org

This often features Palestinian and Israeli artists in order to help focus attention on relieving the humanitarian crisis in Gaza which has been under a severe economic blockade imposed by the Israeli occupation since 2006. Gaza Corner has evolved to include news and music from other regions of the Middle East and North Africa.



An unmanned U.S. Predator drone
Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Images

Yemen:
On the ground in a country where unmanned missile atttacks are a terrifyingly regular occurence



The people of Yemen can hear destruction before it arrives. In cities, towns and villages across this country, which hangs off the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula, the air buzzes with the sound of American drones flying overhead. The sound is a constant and terrible reminder: a robot plane, acting on secret intelligence, may calculate that the man across from you at the coffee shop, or the acquaintance with whom you've shared a passing word on the street, is an Al Qaeda operative. This intelligence may be accurate or it may not, but it doesn't matter. If you are in the wrong place at the wrong time, the chaotic buzzing above sharpens into the death-herald of an incoming missile.

Such quite literal existential uncertainty is coming at a deep psychological cost for the Yemeni people. For Americans, this military campaign is an abstraction. The drone strikes don't require U.S. troops on the ground, and thus are easy to keep out of sight and out of mind. Over half of Yemen's 24.8 million citizens – militants and civilians alike – are impacted every day. A war is happening, and one of the unforeseen casualties is the Yemeni mind.

Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, trauma and anxiety are becoming rampant in the different corners of the country where drones are active. "Drones hover over an area for hours, sometimes days and weeks," said Rooj Alwazir, a Yemeni-American anti-drone activist and cofounder of Support Yemen, a media collective raising awareness about issues afflicting the country. Yemenis widely describe suffering from constant sleeplessness, anxiety, short-tempers, an inability to concentrate and, unsurprisingly, paranoia.

Last year, London-based forensic psychologist Peter Schaapveld presented research he'd conducted on the psychological impact of drone strikes in Yemen to a British parliamentary sub-committee. He reported that 92 percent of the population sample he examined was found to be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder – with children being the demographic most significantly affected. Women, he found, claimed to be miscarrying from their fear of drones. "This is a population that by any figure is hugely suffering," Schaapveld said. The fear of drones, he added, "is traumatizing an entire generation."

Air strikes by U.S. drones and Yemeni jets have grown in frequency in recent months, destroying families, and as such have stoked resentment. "For every one person killed," psychologist Schaapveld argued, "there are going to be hundreds that are affected psychologically."

Missile strikes, allegedly by U.S. drones — which American officials argue is a safer, more efficient and precise form of aerial warfare than using piloted fighter jets or sending ground troops — have now been reported in twelve of Yemen's 21 governorates, with as many as 504 people killed in confirmed strikes since 2002, according to data compiled by the London-based Bureau of Investigative Journalism. Another 44 people have been killed in possible U.S. strikes.

The overall fatality count, though, is clouded by America's growing use of so-called "signature strikes" — guilt-by-association attacks against suspected but unidentified targets. Having committed no prior crime, these victims' names are not part of any list and in some cases, not even known. Many Yemenis say that the increased prevalence of signature strikes makes it impossible for them to predetermine possible targets, heightening anxieties among those who feel that they will inevitably end up in the crosshairs.

Beginning in 2009, the Obama administration made drone strikes its go-to method for killing members of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), causing a spike in reports of drones in Yemen.

The U.S. has tacitly admitted some culpability for accidental civilian deaths. Caitlin Hayden, a spokesperson for the National Security Council, says that, "in situations where we have concluded that civilians have been killed, the U.S. has made condolence payments where appropriate and possible."

None of the families to whom the author spoke to report receiving any payment from the American government, but some families, including those impacted by the wedding strike, have been promised compensation, in the form of 101 rifles and $101,000, from the Yemeni government.