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October 2017 Tangents
Greece Music Tour Sold Out


(click to be on waiting list or in loop for 2018 Greece tour)


On recent scouting trip to Greece, Dore was entertained by Cretan cats in Chania, Crete - one of the stops on the Oct 2017 Tangents Greece Music  Tour.
Photo by Donna Ludlow



Rescued from a kill shelter in Manteca, Petey Pumpkinhead III entered our lives 7 years ago. Abused by a previous owner he was skittish and nippish. That changed with love, affection and attention.

He was a majestic furry orange tabby. His coat emitted a perpetually lovely fragrance. He had the sexiest strut with an ever present erect tail and endearing behind.

Petey had simple needs. Belly rubs topped the list. He loved resting in his backyard igloo. He would prance out when I entered the yard and open wide for belly rubs and rolly polly.

He bonded with Klimey who also was rescued from a shelter. Klimey loved licking Petey and taught Petey how to love back. They were inseparable.

Petey-Weedy (as we called him) evolved into the sweetest and most gentle of companions. When hungry, he would jump into bed and delicately place his paw on my face. No histrionics, just a love tap and breakfast was on.

He loved sleeping inside the space between my legs or alongside the curve of Clara's thigh. His body language suggested the most delicious of dreams. He also had the squeakiest yawn when awakened.

Petey had a ravenous appetite and wore his weight well. That changed last October when he dropped 2 pounds in short order and was diagnosed with congestive heart failure.

He continued to lose weight but his sweet demeanor never changed. Although not a lap cat during his youth, lately I would place him in my lap in the back yard and we would stay together for long periods. These were cherished moments. Klimey would join us and stay by Petey's side.

Strong medication was required every 8 hours to dissipate the fluid in his lungs. No matter how much lasix was dosed, it could not stay on top of the progression of his heart disease.

Last week Petey hit a low point and could hardly breath. He hadn't eaten for 2+ days. We upped the lasix and he recovered miraculously. His breathing appeared normal and he started eating - but only food fresh out of the can. He ate more than he had in months. He had playful sparring sessions with Klimey, tons of rolly polly and belly rubs, his tail was erect and he slept next to my face the other day.

Today he had a good appetite in the early afternoon. I didn't see him the rest of the day. When the thunder rumbled and the rain came pouring down I went outside.

He was in the igloo. I tipped it and he ran inside. But something was wrong.

His breathing was labored. Petey could not catch his breath. He had breathing attacks before and I had feared the worst, yet Petey always persevered.

An hour or so later when Clara came home, Petey's condition had worsened. When he walked from under a table to lie down in the litter box that was an alarming signal. I picked him up and he let out a cry. Petey went under the bed where Klimey was and continued to make anguished yelps.

We left him alone. Petey soon emerged and we put him in a blanket by the heater.

He wanted to be left alone.

Petey-Weedy barely could walk and stumbled out the bedroom and down a few steps to the cat door. Somehow he pushed himself through. The igloo was two feet from the door.

We let him be.

An hour later Clara checked on Petey.

His fur was gorgeous. His body still warm.

But Petey had passed.

He never made it to the igloo.





Moti has been missing since Sept 2014.  On Jan 23, 2015 while walking in McClaren Park a cat resembling Moti emerged on a tree branch above a thicket of bushes. This brightened our hearts as Clara and I imagine Moti as a feline Tarzan.  Clara wrote the below poem before we confirmed the cat was not Moti.

Moti Sighting
by Clara Hsu

Who sits on a branch
above a field of thorns?
My cat. My cat.

Who listens to his names
and twitches his ears?
My cat. My cat.

His looks have changed since autumn
from living wild and eating mice.
We’re trespassing his kingdom
that can’t be bought
at
 any price.

Running streams.
Catnip on the hills.






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Songlines Music Travel
(click for details)

Shares the Tangents philosophy that nothing beats experiencing music at its source.

2017 Trips:

Morocco - Eassaouira Gnawa Festival
June 27-July 3, 2017

Argentina - Get Tangoed!
August 2017

Romania - At Home with the Gypsies
September 2-10, 2017

Colombia - Bogota, Medellin and Cartagena
September 11-22, 2017

India - Rajasthan Musical Adventure
September 29-October 10, 2017

Senegal - Never Mind the Mbalax
November 19-28, 2017






Gaza Facts

Click link above to get facts about Gaza, a collaborative project by Jewish Voice for Peace Bay Area (JVP-BA) and the Council on American-Islamic Relations San Francisco Bay Area (CAIR-SFBA).


Physicians for Human Rights – Israel (PHRI); The only Israel based NGO providing medical assistance to Gazans.
Click above logo to donate.

Click below for the withdrawn 2017 UN report:
“Israeli Practices towards the Palestinian People and the Question of Apartheid”




Click for Gaza Corner Archive

Saturdays 11p on Tangents, 91.7 fm SF, webcast/archived at
kalw.
You can subscribe to Gaza Corner as a podcast by accessing this feed URL.
(for iTunes users the menu item is "File / Subscribe to Podcast...")

Gaza Corner includes news and opinion from the Middle East (and beyond) often ignored by the mainstream media followed by music from the relevant country or culture.

Gaza Corner was originally conceived to focus attention on relieving the humanitarian crisis in Gaza which has been under a severe blockade imposed by Israel since 2006.  Gaza Corner has evolved to include the Middle East, Magreb, Kurdistan and Turkey.

 Click headlines below for full stories. Headlines are sometimes retitled to more accurately reflect content.

Gaza Corner Audio 5/27/17

note: The audio from this broadcast should be uploaded
to the
Gaza Corner Archive within 48 hours of broadcast.

When Starvation is a Weapon

excerpt:

The struggle of the Palestinian political prisoners is one against solitary confinement, abuse by
prison officials, a lack of adequate medical care, and for the right to visits from family members.

These are the very same demands that we as political prisoners on Robben Island made to the
apartheid prison authorities. 

We were beaten by our captors, but never experienced the type of abuse and torture that some of the Palestinian prisoners complain of.
It was rare that we were put in solitary confinement, but this seems commonplace in Israeli jails.

It is time the Israeli government and the world listened to their demands. At the end of the day,
even political prisoners have basic human rights.

(Sunny Singh, Pressreader.com, Sunday Tribune, 5/21/17)
Sunny Singh is a former Robben Island political prisoner
who was on the Island from 1964-1974.

Israel treats prisoners worse than apartheid, says Robben Island veteran

excerpt:

The situation of the Palestinian prisoners reminds the older generation in South Africa of their past.

Dr. Bangani Ngeleza grew up under South African apartheid.

“I am a child of an ANC freedom fighter who was imprisoned on Robben Island for 10 years by the apartheid regime.”

Ngeleza added that the decision to go on hunger strike “represents the highest level of commitment and bravery in asserting one’s dignity and human rights.”

(Adri Nieuwhof Activism and BDS Beat, Electronic Intifada, 5/25/17)


Protesters gather under a banner with a picture of Marwan Barghouti during a rally supporting Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, Ramallah, West Bank, May 3, 2017. Nasser Nasser/AP

Palestinian Prisoners' Hunger Strike in Israeli Jails Ends

excerpt:

The prisoners’ two primary demands were for more frequent family visits and for prisoners to be allowed to speak to their families on public phones under supervision.

Haaretz has learned that over the past two weeks senior officials from the Shin Bet security service met with senior Palestinian officials and discussed with them the prisoners' demands. The meetings showed that the defense establishment was intending to meet some of the prisoners' demands and improve their conditions. However, the Shin Bet demanded that the hunger strike end first.

(Yaniv Kubovich and Jack Khoury, Haaretz, 5/27/17)


A man holds a photo of Marwan Barghouti calling for his release during a rally supporting those detained in Israeli jails after hundreds of prisoners launched a hunger strike, in the West Bank town of Hebron on 4/17/17
 (AFP Photo/Hazem Bader)

Ending strike after 40 days, Barghouti is now Abbas’s undisputed heir

excerpt:

Palestinian media has been ceaselessly singing Barghouti’s praises. His picture is once again on display in every village, town and refugee camp. His name is now familiar even to those who were born after he went to jail for his role in leading the Second Palestinian Intifada and his five murder convictions.

For many of them, and however unpalatable to many in Israel, he is the Palestinian Nelson Mandela and, more practically, their next leader after Abbas.

(Avi Issacharoff, Times of Israel, 5/27/17)

South Africans: Israeli Apartheid “More Terrifying” than South Africa 

Nelson Mandela: "Our freedom is incomplete without the freedom of the Palestinians."

excerpt:

In 2008 a delegation of ANC veterans visited Israel and the Occupied Territories...one member said “The daily indignity to which the Palestinian population is subjected far outstrips the apartheid regime.”

One of the Jewish members of the delegation said that the Israelis are even more efficient in implementing the separation-of-races regime than the South Africans were.
(Washington Blog, 7/31/14)