Tangents Radio

Home
Turkey Music Tour
Playlist (KALW)
Tangents Parties
Gaza Corner Archive
Maroc Tour
Playlist (Mondomix)
Current CD's
Calendar
Feedback
Editorial
Tangential Angels
About Dore
Contact

Sign up for Tangents
e-mail list

Subi
Subi Memorial






Have you seen our gray and black striped tabby Moti?
Missing since early September.
He has ID chip.
Last seen corner Gambier and Felton st (Portola/Excesior)
Call 415 584-4367

301 Gambier Street
Pray for Moti!


Rescued from a kill shelter in Manteca, Petey Pumpkinhead III entered our lives 7 years ago. Abused by a previous owner he was skittish and nippish. That changed with love, affection and attention.

He was a majestic furry orange tabby. His coat emitted a perpetually lovely fragrance. He had the sexiest strut with an ever present erect tail and endearing behind.

Petey had simple needs. Belly rubs topped the list. He loved resting in his backyard igloo. He would prance out when I entered the yard and open wide for belly rubs and rolly polly.

He bonded with Klimey who also was rescued from a shelter. Klimey loved licking Petey and taught Petey how to love back. They were inseparable.

Petey-Weedy (as we called him) evolved into the sweetest and most gentle of companions. When hungry, he would jump into bed and delicately place his paw on my face. No histrionics, just a love tap and breakfast was on.

He loved sleeping inside the space between my legs or alongside the curve of Clara's thigh. His body language suggested the most delicious of dreams. He also had the squeakiest yawn when awakened.

Petey had a ravenous appetite and wore his weight well. That changed last October when he dropped 2 pounds in short order and was diagnosed with congestive heart failure.

He continued to lose weight but his sweet demeanor never changed. Although not a lap cat during his youth, lately I would place him in my lap in the back yard and we would stay together for long periods. These were cherished moments. Klimey would join us and stay by Petey's side.

Strong medication was required every 8 hours to dissipate the fluid in his lungs. No matter how much lasix was dosed, it could not stay on top of the progression of his heart disease.

Last week Petey hit a low point and could hardly breath. He hadn't eaten for 2+ days. We upped the lasix and he recovered miraculously. His breathing appeared normal and he started eating - but only food fresh out of the can. He ate more than he had in months. He had playful sparring sessions with Klimey, tons of rolly polly and belly rubs, his tail was erect and he slept next to my face the other day.

Today he had a good appetite in the early afternoon. I didn't see him the rest of the day. When the thunder rumbled and the rain came pouring down I went outside.

He was in the igloo. I tipped it and he ran inside. But something was wrong.

His breathing was labored. Petey could not catch his breath. He had breathing attacks before and I had feared the worst, yet Petey always persevered.

An hour or so later when Clara came home, Petey's condition had worsened. When he walked from under a table to lie down in the litter box that was an alarming signal. I picked him up and he let out a cry. Petey went under the bed where Klimey was and continued to make anguished yelps.

We left him alone. Petey soon emerged and we put him in a blanket by the heater.

He wanted to be left alone.

Petey-Weedy barely could walk and stumbled out the bedroom and down a few steps to the cat door. Somehow he pushed himself through. The igloo was two feet from the door.

We let him be.

An hour later Clara checked on Petey.

His fur was gorgeous. His body still warm.

But Petey had passed.

He never made it to the igloo.


Back from exhilarating 2014 Tangents Turkey Music Tour;
Click for trip in review + photos


Next tour 2016
if conditions allow


To be in the loop, email:
 




Advertisement on wall of Nardis jazz club in Istanbul where 2014 Tangents Turkey Music Tour saw Turkey's most famous jazz musician, drummer Okay Temiz,  among 11 world class concerts in 16 nights.. 


Listen to Tangents
Sat. nights, 8-mid, KALW 91.7 FM, S.F.
  Streamed live at kalw.org
+
also webcast on Berlin's multicult.fm

The most recent Tangents show
 is archived on KALW

Tangents Radio is also on
Facebook & Twitter


Click to make contribution to MECA that provides emergency aid to children and families in Gaza

Gaza Facts
Click above to get the real facts about Gaza, a collaborative project by Jewish Voice for Peace Bay Area (JVP-BA) and the Council on American-Islamic Relations San Francisco Bay Area (CAIR-SFBA).

Songlines Music Travel
(click for details)

Shares the Tangents philosophy that nothing beats experiencing music at its source.

2014 Trip:

Cuba  - New Year Celebrations
December 29 2014-January 12 2015

2015 Trips:

Cuba - The Music of Cuba
May 2-16, 2015

Morocco - Gnawa Festival
May 14-18, 2015

Borneo - Rainforest Festival
August 2-11, 2015

Romania - At Home with the Gypsies
August 15-23, 2015

Colombia – NEW TRIP
August 2015*

India – Rajasthan Musical Adventure
October 17-28, 2015

Senegal – Never Mind the Mbalax
November 20-29, 2015




Excellent new album by Palestinian oudist Adnan Joubran with Indian and flamenco influences.

Gaza Corner
Click above for Archive
(Archive does not view in Google Chrome)


Saturdays 11p on Tangents, 91.7 fm SF, kalw.org

This weekly feature includes news from the Middle East often ignored by the mainstream press coupled with music from the region.

Gaza Corner was conceived to help focus attention on relieving the humanitarian crisis in Gaza which has been under a severe economic blockade imposed by the Israeli occupation since 2006.

 Click headlines below for full stories.

 


Defence for Children International-Palestine (DCI-Palestine) is  an independent, child rights organization based in Ramallah dedicated to defending and promoting the rights of children living in the occupied West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and the Gaza Strip in accordance with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). 
excerpt:

"I won't move until I say goodbye to my mother."

"For speaking these words, Diyaa was knocked to the floor of his family home, kicked, and beaten by Israeli soldiers who, two weeks earlier, had done the same to his two friends. It was 3 am, and Diyaa's parents could only watch as their 16-year-old son was dragged to an army jeep, blindfolded, and—like thousands of Palestinian children before him—forced into a military detention center in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

What happened next, according to affidavits given by Diyaa and his friends, fits a pattern of Israeli abuse designed to coerce confessions from Palestinian children. Among the most troubling of their experiences were prolonged periods of solitary confinement.

 "Although it’s true that, in the United States, children and juvenile offenders are sometimes held in solitary confinement—either as a disciplinary measure or to separate them from adult populations—in Israeli military detention, Palestinian children are held in solitary confinement for interrogation purposes," said Brad Parker, international advocacy officer and attorney for DCI-Palestine.

Torture

"Using solitary confinement in this way is conduct that amounts to torture under international law," says Parker. The United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture has explicitly found that solitary confinement, when "used intentionally during pretrial detention as a technique for the purpose of obtaining information or a confession" amounts to torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

In more than 97 percent of cases documented by DCI-Palestine between 2012 and 2013, "children held in solitary confinement were not properly informed of their right to silence, were denied access to legal counsel and did not have a family member present during interrogation," according to a May 2014 report prepared by the organization. In the same time period, more than three-quarters of child detainees were strip searched, subject to physical abuse, and denied access to food and water.

Isolation, interrogation, and beatings

On the day of his detention, 16-year-old Diyaa remembers being thrown into a windowless cell, where he was to spend the next 15 days. During that time, he emerged only to be escorted to an interrogation room. He estimates that he was interrogated 15 times, for two hours each—all with his feet and hands bound to "a low metal chair."

The interrogator accused Diyaa of throwing stones, an offense that, according to a November 2009 Israeli military order, could carry a sentence of up to 20 years. "I kept saying I wanted to see a lawyer," Diyaa recalls.

"He asked me when I threw stones and with whom, but I did not answer. He interrogated me for about two hours. He did the same the following five days."

On the fifth day, Diyaa relented. "I had to confess to throwing stones because of my horrible detention conditions in the cell. I also thought they would transfer me to a regular prison if I confessed." But even after his "confession," Diyaa was thrown back into his cell. His isolation was to last another 10 days, punctuated by more interrogations and, this time, beatings.

"One of the jailers used to beat me whenever I knocked on the door to ask for something," Diyaa told DCI-Palestine. "He would come to the cell with another jailer, tie my hands and feet, and kick me hard while I was on the floor, and punch me on my stomach and head without any mercy."

Forced confessions

The aim, it turned out, was to extract another confession—for a specific stone-throwing incident to which Diyaa's friend had, according to the interrogator, already admitted.

But in sworn testimony to DCI-Palestine, Diyaa denied any involvement in the incident:

"The interrogator said that my friend Thabet accused me in his statement of throwing stones with him at a settler car, that the car overturned and the passengers were injured. I told him that was not true, and that I was at the local supermarket when I heard about the incident."

Diyaa's friend Thabet, it turns out, had just admitted to stoning a car carrying residents of an illegal settlement near his hometown of Nablus, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. But the 16-year-old's "confession" came after four days of solitary confinement and abuse.

 According to Thabet, an Israeli interrogator told him: "If you don't confess, I'll have both of your parents arrested, brought here to this room, and killed." 

"I was scared they would actually do what they said they would do about arresting and killing my parents," Thabet told DCI-Palestine. "So I confessed. I confessed to throwing stones several times at a settler car, and the stones hit the car and overturned it, and that the passengers were injured, as I [recall]."

Fending for themselves

Until their "confessions," Diyaa, Thabet, and a third friend—17-year-old Bashar, also accused of stone-throwing—were left to fend for themselves, deprived of family visits and legal counsel. Parker says this, too, is part of a pattern of Israeli abuse:

"[Child detainees] are often denied access to an attorney until after being subjected to several days of prolonged interrogation and isolation," according to Parker. "The apparent goal," he says, "is to obtain a confession" at all costs.

"This pattern of abuse by Israel is grave," said Richard Falk, a former United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Occupied Palestinian Territory. Falk, who is also a professor emeritus of international law at Princeton University, called Israel’s use of solitary confinement against children "inhumane, cruel, degrading, and unlawful; and, most worryingly, it is likely to adversely affect the mental and physical health of underage detainees."

Widespread abuse

According to the cases DCI-Palestine documented in 2012 and 2013, some 20 percent of Palestinian child detainees were subjected to solitary confinement during their interrogations. Any "confessions" extracted by this practice are suspect, say legal experts.

"Israeli military court judges rarely exclude confessions or other evidence extracted from coercive interrogations," says Parker. "Palestinian child detainees are denied access to counsel, ill-treated and tortured, and then find themselves before a military court process that falls drastically short of international juvenile justice standards."

As of September, DCI-Palestine recorded 182 Palestinian children in Israeli detention. Since 2000, an estimated 8,000 Palestinian children have been detained and prosecuted in the Israeli military court system.

Samer Badawi is a freelance contributor to Defense for Children International Palestine. Based in Washington, DC, he spent the summer reporting in Gaza for +972 Mag. Follow him @samwithaner.